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Thanks to SpaceX and Elon Musk, a space-mannequin driving a red Tesla Roadster is burned into our brains. USA

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Neil Armstrong's iconic photograph of fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin standing on the surface of the moon has always been the epitome of iconic moments in space photography.

However, thanks to SpaceX visionary Elon Musk, there's a new image burned into our brains: a spacesuit-clad mannequin in the driver's seat of a red Tesla Roadster. 

On Tuesday, SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy rocket from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla., on a mission to loop around the sun for hundreds of millions of years.

While Falcon Heavy blasting off into space served as another reminder of the wonders of space travel, the indelible image of this voyage is "Starman," the mannequin sitting inside the Tesla.

Here's everything you need to know about Starman:

Why is it (and the Roadster) on this rocket?

According to Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX (and potentially a real-world Tony Stark in the making), test flights often include mass simulators involving concrete or steel blocks.

Of course, that's not good enough for Musk, which is why we see Starman in a Roadster, playing David Bowie's Space Oddity.

"That seemed extremely boring," Musk said of settling for concrete or steel blocks. "Of course, anything boring is terrible, especially companies, so we decided to send something unusual, something that made us feel."

Starman's suit actually works

During a press conference following Falcon Heavy's launch, Musk noted the sleek spacesuit is fully functioning. The biggest challenge was creating a suit that can handle the rigors of space travel yet still look fashionable.

"That’s one of the qualification articles, so that’s the real deal," he said. "I mean, it’s dangerous, it’s a dangerous trip, you want to look good." 

The other benefit: testing the suit in specific conditions — say, traveling in a Tesla on a rocket ship orbiting the sun — would help SpaceX move closer to rocket launches with human crews.

You can watch Starman's view right now

If you want a glimpse of the journey, SpaceX is streaming it online, with multiple live views of Starman's adventure.

The launch itself was remarkable because of the reusable rockets

Reflecting Musk’s broader space ambitions, SpaceX did not settle merely for launching the big rocket on its first test flight, reports Florida Today's James Dean.

The Heavy’s two side boosters, which each had launched missions in 2016, successfully flew back to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, deployed legs and landed on twin pads.

The side-by-side touchdowns about eight minutes after liftoff unleashed powerful sonic booms.

Contributing: James Dean from Florida Today 

Follow Brett Molina on Twitter: @brettmolina23.

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